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2012 December 16 [Sunday]

Happy Pandas

I've always wanted to attend a scientific Foss hacking session in Python and last Sunday, I made that idea come true. So how do you even begin to describe a fantastic Sunday that got over even before it started. Well, that was how it felt in retrospect...  :-)

Having kick-started the Pydata-Pandas workshop-sprint, it was annoying to catch a viral bug the week before the sprint-workshop one is  organizing - talk about increasing the stress levels. The cold weather did add to my discomfort, but could not dent my enthusiasm - I was organising my first event on a whim, at short notice in a new city (country?) where I hardly knew anyone, not to mention it was at the start of the Holiday Season! See what I mean about having perfect timing ... gee, what was I thinking!?!

Aahz announced it on the Pythonsprints site and soon enough Sunday dawned bright and shiny. I reached the Pivotal Labs Manhattan office to find Asheesh calmly sprawled on the ground calmly munching on croissants and sipping Java (err..coffee). We had planned to come in a little earlier incase someone needed installation help. I had not eaten any breakfast but I was more stressed than hungry as this was the first event I was organizing in an alien country. I declined the yummy snacks and nervously wondered if Chang would show up?; ... will all the people who registered show up?; ... this was the Sunday before the Christmas week and maybe everyone may decide to sleep-in or go off on a holiday; would Saturday have been a better choice, or maybe we should not have kept it free - what if nobody came despite registering, what if ....   oh, well..the monkey-mind was hard at work :-P

Disastrous thoughts were stronger than the currents of the Niagara, when Chang and Emily made their appearance and I managed to make small conversation as the stress ebbed away. Things were sunnier when JT arrived and opened the doors, leaving me with less time to indulge my monkey-mind. We all got busy setting up the space for the event, arranged the tables and chairs, checked if enough power-points were available, checked the video camera, set up the name tags, did a recce of the adjoining kitchen.

Pivotal Labs has the nicest open kitchen, well-stocked with a variety of snacks, fruits, nuts and a large variety of drinks that cater to all taste buds. I hate carbonated sugary drinks and artificial flavouring which restricts my choice to drinking H2O, but to my surprise there was coconut water. Now if you liked your pint of beer while coding, the PL kitchen had that too. A big shout-out (Thank You :)) in gratitude to Pivotal Labs for being the most gracious host an organizer could ask for!

Back to the tiny tasks bits, I got a print out of Chang's presentation so he could have his notes handy during the workshop. The machine was a Mac, so ipython files would not work. The solution was a PDF. When you are organising an event like this there may be small miniscule things that can hold up your event so you would need to plan and budget time for them. Someday I shall collate my thoughts on 'how to organise small events' like workshops and sprints in a new blog entry.

A little past 10 AM, I introduced Chang She to the assembled attendees, and Chang kick-started the Pandas workshop by walking us through the Pandas data structures for 1-dimensional, 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional data. He moved on to DataFrame components and indexing, accessing data via files and Databases, Broadcasting and some basic Statistical computations. 

It was not all theory, as all the participants were following and experimenting on their laptops, in part, thanks to Asheesh's excellent "Laptop setup guide", enabling attendees to come with configured machines, making it easier to get going with Pandas. They worked on the small tasks and exercises that Chang gave out as the session progressed.

Soon it was lunch time and Asheesh being in-charge of the food (and the finances), did an awesome job of keeping us well-fed - we had Vegitarian wraps, Egg wraps and Hummus wraps, and Salads. That was the first meal of the day for me and over lunch I got to know a nice group of interesting people; with the conversation meandering around scientific programming with Python, Julia and R-language, different programming environments, our offices, work, etc..

Small talk and big lunch over, it was now time to Sprint - not literally, just the mental hacking kind! Chang split us up into small groups of 2-3 people and it was very exciting to see the attendees pored over their machines, trying to tackle Pandas bugs.  Working in small groups of 2 (or 3) people meant Chang could walk around and talk to each group to help and guide them. He was ably aided by Asheesh who also went around helping other sprinters, answering questions, etc...

I was neck deep in the Pandas code and a flash went off - looked up to see Asheesh behind the lens. Reminded me that I had totally forgotten to click pictures. Having organized multiple workshops over the last few years, Asheesh was an experienced pro unlike the rookie (me) organizing her first event. Pictures speak a thousand words:
[0] https://plus.google.com/photos/113578342347990591936/albums/5823492237517007505?authkey=CIC53t-xnYGVZQ
[1] http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulproteus/sets/72157632277350121/detail/


The sprint went on till evening, when finally at 1745 hours, Pivotal Labs had to ask us to leave. Yeah, we had so much fun that they had to tell us it was time to go home !

For those who love numbers, enjoy these statistics. We had 31 registrations (Capped at 30, but we had a waiting list that accommodated the cancellations.) and 18 people attended the Pandas Workshop-Sprint, with 7 female hackers, which makes it a cool 39% female attendees :-))  Infact, three female researchers had to opt out due to other obligations during the holiday season. The most amazing email was from a person who missed the registration by a few minutes, wanting to drop by on Sunday morning hoping for last minute cancellations. _That_ was the kind of response I would have expected for a talk, never for a Sprint!

Ofcourse, this entire event would not have been possible without our generous sponsors. A huge Thank you to:
* Chang She for conducting the workshop.
* Pivotal Labs, our generous host for the day -Thanks JT for spending an entire Sunday with us.
* The Python Software Foundation, whose generous grant for "Breakfast+Lunch and Asheesh's travel from Boston", kept us fueled and
on track all day.
* O'reilly Media, who gave all attendees a free E-book copy of Wes McKinney's "Pandas for Data Analysis", including a 40% discount on the
print copy of Wes's book.

Thank You Everyone !


2012 December 4 [Tuesday]

Announcing the Pandas Workshop Sprint

Positively thrilled to announce the one-day hands-on intensive Pandas workshop and sprint for new contributors with Chang She - a Pandas core-dev leading the sprint.  Its 4 am'ish and I just finished spamming a few mailing lists, IRC channels and thought I'll write a blog-post if I must be energetically expensive.

You can find the workshop details on the wiki: https://github.com/svaksha/PyData-Workshop-Sprint/wiki/2012-NYC but here is a short "how did it happen in a week recap". Last month, I had attended a day-long "Introduction to JavaScript" by JohnResig, and I enjoyed it. Later, I met some PyLadies and on the train ride home, I felt that we needed to have a proper workshop, core-dev in attendance, leading us along the way.

Given that there was a PyData conference in NY a few weeks ago, this was the place to be at, so I pinged the diversity list for speakers, and of course IRC - The response was phenomenal and unbelievable - People went out of their way to make my wish come true - they tweeted, emailed, chatted on IRC, gave me advice, introduced me to core-devs, volunteered for the event, pinged friends for hosting space, encouraged me to write to the PSF/sprints funding, ... and on and on.

I have so many people to thank that there will be a longer blog post, post the event  ...yeah, the list is long but maybe if I get started now (and my apologies if I have missed your name  ... feel free to gently lart me, its 4AM and I am sleep deprived :)) ...  Alphabetically-ordered XXXL THANK YOU'S to: Aahz, Asheesh, Brian, Carl, Chang, David, Diana, Jesse, Josh Knowles, Krissy, Meghan, Sheila, Steve, Wes.


2012 November 17 [Saturday]

Pycon Canada 2012 in Toronto

import pycon
from pycommunity import AwesomePeople

canada = pycon.path.abspath(pycon.path.dirname(__file__))
README = open(pycon.path.join(canada, 'README.rst')).read()
__version__ = '0.01'

requires = [
    'diana',
    'daniel',
    'david',
    'kay',
'micheal',
    'nicola',
    'taavi',
    ]

Patches welcome!

Last weekend, at this moment, I was giving a technical talk at Pycon Canada, my first. Right now, I am still wallowing in the fun and warmth of friendships (some old, some new) that thawed the cold Canadian weather. It was the most mentally simulating, energy-packed experience I've had.  Oh, wait...I say that about all the PyCon conferences I attend - Well, this is my second PyCon but the first speaking gig, and it has, as before, been about meeting some of the smartest people and having the most intellectually simulating discussions with them, learning from them and having a whale of a time. Wish all my weekends were this much fUn! The Python community is known for just that - their fabulously fantastic community, which attracted me to the language (no, I love the syntax too) and has kept me hooked.

Thanks to the change in climate (thanks Sandy!), I had a migrane that got worse on the plane ride on Friday morning and I was much happier landing in a slightly warmer and dry climate in Toronto. Enjoyed the shortest ferry ride of my life and reached the Metropolitan Hotel by 2pm to find the Google goodie-bags waiting for us at the hotel room - such a nice surprise, thanks Google!  Went for a long walk in the afternoon - its a relief to be able to walk around and see the city and its inhabitants without men bumping into you, or tripping yourself over jutting stones on the sidewalk (erm...whenever Indian roads have a sidewalk), the calmness of being able to stop and click pictures without worrying about someone "accidentally" (it always is, isnt it?) feeling you up while you were just standing there admiring a monument ........ Oh, well... never mind, you get the picture!

Later that evening, there was a casual mixer event enabling attendees, speakers and some awesome sponsors (one of them being Google, whose Diversity grant made this conference a reality for me) to register, hang out, and chat before the conference, with food and drinks at the venue bar open to all... and oh, we ate some yummy cake. Mixers before your conference is a smart way to avoid the rush and long lines that will queue up to register on the morning of your conference, a nightmare if you are short on volunteers.

I managed to reach the venue thanks to Suzanne (who I randomly stopped on the road to ask for directions, instead she ended up dropping me off till the venue - its amazing how one meets kind souls), met Laura at the registration desk who saw that every attendee had their badges and tags. Nicola introduced me to Sheila, who suddenly morphed into a real person instead of an email address with a picture attached to it. In a global distributed space knit via bits and bytes, our identities are unequivocally tied to an email, twitter, G+/FB account now.

Met more interesting people and had the longest discussion with Mark Eichin and his friend Laura, on a range of technical topics, mobile technology, languages, and not excluding the mandatory talk about the DFSG and licenses in FOSS - talking legalese is the most important thing when you meet a DD (j/k). After the party, I returned to the room, met Laren, another diversity grant recipient room-sharing with me. By now, the pounding in my head was worse and the pain would not let me sleep, so I kept re-editing my slides till I was tired enough to sleep.

On Saturday morning - Day One of the conference, Laren and me walked over to the venue and I went of into the Green Room where all the speakers were pampered with food, some space to sit and work with you laptop, more food, chat with other speakers while having even more food, but I had no taste buds so I took three Advil's and gave my first technical talk.  That done, I was free to go and watch talks but instead I went off to be a volunteer - this is the easiest way to make friends with some really cool people within the community who welcome and appreciate your contribution and efforts. Its also very humbling to see the PyConCA board members and speakers who volunteered to carry in the lunch boxes the caterer had dropped off.

Post lunch, I attended the "Numerical and Scientific Computing with Python" tutorial by David, listened some great speakers, spoke to more people, had interesting discussions on NLP and linguistics with Mike and DWF, and before I knew it, it was the end of the day, which means more food - snacks and drinks were available at the bar. Did I mention that Pycon-CA pampers you with food and drinks all through the day. At every break, there was something to munch on. Every where I looked there were food boxes, fruits / salad boxes, cookies, coffee, tea, drinks, water bottles, cakes, tacos, samosas (I noticed that those ran out really quickly as compared to the salads which is not surprising), strawberry and chocolate, juice, .... ummm..ok, you get the picture. You were very well-fed and taken care of. At one point I counted the number of laptops Vs. the food boxes on the table. Guess which was outnumbered!?

Sunday morning, being the second and final day of the conference, I attended talks on Graph databases in Python and Persona (identity/privacy, which is important to me) and later, Greg Wilson and a bunch of speakers in the green room had an interesting conversation on education and knowledge (or the lack thereof) in the current education system, what role do Universities and schools have to play within the system - are they redundant with their monolithic rigid structures, MOOC's, their pro's and cons, and how the internet and technology is changing the education system, whether sites like Udacity and Coursera (did you know that their business model allows them to sell your personal details to publishers like McGraw Hill and their ilk, who have apparently signed on the dotted line) are imparting knowledge to their users and learners at the risk of their privacy? Where exactly is creativity, mental development, critical thought, knowledge and learning today? That was more food for thought than the food around the table. Post lunch, I morphed into a Runner - yeah, its that person who runs behind each speaker! Katie and me were deputed to the Main hall speakers and got to see all the talks, including lightning talks, ending with Fernando's (not-to-be-missed) closing keynote.
Videos:
No matter how hard you try, you cannot attend every fantastic talk out there. When Carl sent across the video link to me, I was stunned by the excellent production quality. The first thought that crossed my mind was "Wow, that is a second career right there" and sure enough it is - these excellent videos are brought to you by nextdayvideo.com :

* Taavi showing you how pandas get a workout
* Elizabeth Leddy rocking the Main Hall
* Did you Test today?
* No conference is complete without a talk on "BigData"
* Brandon Rhodes on why he thinks Python is beautiful (a must see if you are a beginner to Python)

Wow, this post has gotten too long. Among all the things, I admire the organizational abilities of the board the most. The conference had awesome sponsors too, one of them being Google, whose Diversity grant made it possible for me to attend the event. Initially, when my talk was accepted, I had planned book the bus tickets in advance so that I could stretch the grant money to enable me to attend both the days of the conference. When I mentioned this to Diana, she worked her magic, enabling me to cover my flight bookings and also the hotel stay within the grant. Amazing team! Kudos to the PyCon-Canada team.

2011 April 15 [Friday]

Vidalia calling volunteers

Openhatch is holding a 'build it' initiative in collaboration with Vidalia which is the front-end for the proxy you installed on your system. Most importantly, for a change, has India-friendly timings instead of a graveyard shift(s) which make it hard for non-owls (like me) to attend meetings. So, if you have C/C++ skills, dont forget to join #vidalia on irc.oftc.net at 18:30 hrs, today and volunteer! Continue reading for more details from, https://blog.torproject.org/blog/vidalia-get-involved,

Hello everyone, for those who don't know me, I'm the one that's taking care of Vidalia these days.

The other day I was contacted by paulproteus in the #vidalia IRC channel about an initiative they (OpenHatch) are organizing called "Build It".

The idea

Open Source projects live and die depending on contributors and people that want to see the project evolve, but this isn't so easy sometimes. The guys behind the Build It initiative have a theory about this difficulty:

"...lots of users of free desktop software want to get involved in customizing or contributing to the project's development, but they haven't gotten to the first step of getting the program to compile."

Since I'm a Gentoo user for years now, the compilation part comes naturally to me and I haven't thought of this issue that way but it's an interesting approach.

The event

This week, people involved in Vidalia and other Open Source projects will be at a specific time online to help users (future developers, may be :) ) jump over this compilation wall. Particularly, Vidalia is scheduled for this Friday at 13:00 UTC in the same place as usual: #vidalia at OFTC.

While this event is taking place on a particular day and a particular time, I'm online all the time (even when I'm not in front of the computer). So if you want to contribute to Vidalia or any of the projects around Tor (or Tor itself), don't hesitate, just get online and start typing, but be patient and stick around. Also, you'd probably want to read this: https://www.torproject.org/getinvolved/volunteer.html.en

If you want to know more about the Buld It initiative, you can ask in #openhatch at Freenode, or read here: https://openhatch.org/wiki/Build_it


2011 February 9 [Wednesday]

GSoC-2011 invites small FLOSS projects

On the heels of GCI ending a few days ago, GSOC-2011 was announced at LCA. This year there is an important change, that of the participating organizations, as per Carol's mail (below), http://lists.p2pu.org/pipermail/p2pu-dev/2011-February/000288.html :

--
On Tue, 8 Feb 2011, Carol Smith wrote:

Hi all,

Per some feedback from the mentor summit last year, I've decided to
encourage and accept more small and new mentoring organizations this year.
In tandem with more organizations, I am also setting up a separate mailing
list for the newbie organizations to subscribe to to get advice on how to
successfully participate in the program for the summer.

I need your help with this effort. If you know of small/new projects who are
doing interesting work in the opensource space who might not otherwise
apply, please encourage them to do so. We're looking for all kinds of new
orgs - ones doing stuff on the bleeding edge, ones opensourcing stuff that
hasn't been before, ones who might get overlooked because they're otherwise
too small.

There will be two special questions on the mentoring organization
application this year: one for which a large or experienced organization can
vouch for a small, new organization and one for new or small organizations
to list their "references" in the form of veteran orgs or people. These two
questions will be looked at very specifically when we review organization
applications this year so please fill them in if they are applicable for
you.

To facilitate the mentor/mentee relationship between orgs I've set up a
mailing list for both veteran and newbie mentors to join [1]. Please sign up
if you feel comfortable offering advice to new organizations on how to
participate in a successful GSoC. I've made this list invite-only, so please
request membership if you're interested in joining and list the org you
mentor for. After we've announced accepted organizations for this year, the
mentors and org admins from the new projects will be automatically
subscribed to this list and encouraged to ask questions and get advice.
**This will be a chatty list.**

Thank you in advance for your help with this effort, and may this be the
most awesome summer yet!

[1] - http://groups.google.com/group/gsoc-veterans

Cheers,
Carol
--

As you can see, Google is inviting all fledgling free software projects to apply and there is a concerted effort to rope in smaller organizations doing nice things in Libre software this year. So if you know any organization or floss project that should be a part of gsoc, encourage them to join the mailing list and apply for 2011. [UPDATE,2011feb25: Here is a spreadsheet of the FLOSS organizations applying for GSOC-2011, but do remember that this is NOT a final list which is entirely upto Google.]

Like FLOSS projects, GSOC is perhaps the only technical event that is open to students in any stream (you could be studying for your B.A in literature and still participate in GSOC), does not have artificial barriers which perpetuate a myth that only Engineers or Computer Science students can use, decode and contribute to FLOSS. Any student can, provided they put in some effort to understanding the Libre software ecosystem.

So go ahead, download and use their presentations, logos and flyers to promote Gsoc in your college or university, spread the word and participate when the list of accepted projects is announced in March.

[UPDATE,2011feb28: Google has opened the application process for mentoring organizations for Google Summer of Code 2011 which are being accepted at Melange for ALL Libre software organizations. Please note that the application period closes on 11 March at 23:00 UTC.]


2010 November 5 [Friday]

Google Code-In 2010

Today Google announced the list of participating organizations for Google Code-in --earlier known as GHOP, is targeting school-going teens (upper age limit is 18 years) to contribute to Free/Libre software projects. The Code-in starts on 2010-Nov-22, so do read up on all the organization's task lists and encourage your family, friends, and colleagues to participate!

UPDATE: Carol had posted a longer mail to a private list, which is more informative than my two-line post :)

We’re pleased to announce the Google Code-in contest starting this 22-November-2010 and ending on 10-January-2011. This contest is modelled on the success of our pilot program, the Google Highly Open Participation Contest, that was run in 2007-08. We will again be giving 13-18 year old students around the world an opportunity to get involved with open source projects by doing tasks ranging from documentation to outreach to hands-on coding. We're hoping to get lots of women involved in this effort, so we're hoping you'll spread the word about it, or participate yourself if you are eligible.

The participating open source projects that will be serving as mentoring organizations have been chosen from past participants in Google Summer of Code for their commitment to working with younger students as well as their overall mentoring skills. The 20 organizations - twice as many as were in our pilot program - are listed on our site at http://www.google-melange.com/gci/program/accepted_orgs/google/gci2010.

The participants have a chance to earn prizes including cash and teeshirts, with 10 grand prize winners receiving a trip to Google headquarters in Mountain View, California for an awards ceremony. Grand Prize contest winners will be announced on 14, February, 2011.

We’re looking forward to a fun contest this year and hope you’ll consider participating yourself if you are eligible or spread the word to friends, family, and colleagues about the program.

We encourage you to join the Google Code-in contest discussion list: http://groups.google.com/group/gci-discuss and announcement list:
http://groups.google.com/group/gci-announce.

Please see our blog post: http://google-opensource.blogspot.com/2010/10/google-code-in-schools-out-codes-in.html for further details and feel free to contact me directly if you have specific questions that aren’t answered on the website: http://code.google.com/gci.

Cheers,
Carol Smith

2010 October 9 [Saturday]

Openhatch IRC meet

On the Ubuntu-Women list we get a number of women introducing themselves, listing their coding skills, wanting to contribute, etc.. Right now we simply re-direct them to the specific communities within Ubuntu -- to find a project to contribute they have to use keywords to search Launchpad.net for bugs.... search for "perl" / "python" packages, or search for a specific project of choice and squash the bugs listed there -- this does not seem like a terribly efficient way to track participation or contribute, besides being confusing and/or intimidating for someone who is new to the community and is completely un-aware of how floss communities work.

Before anyone says IRC, I should chime in that the infrastructure issues (power outages, poor bandwidth, poor tech support, etc...) in India make it that much harder to contribute. This is not true for other nations with superior basic (power, water, roads, etc..) infrastructure.

So how do we know if a contributor actually searches and finds what she wants to work on or is even comfortable working with? Does she leave because the information she came looking for was not available and/or was simply intimidated by the sheer size and vast technical scope within Ubuntu? These are unanswered questions which I have wondered about -- not knowing if we managed to retain a contributor is a grey area.

Existing members are volunteers themselves with responsibilities, making it harder to track if we are losing technical contributions because we dont know what happens after the initial guidance to a query on the list. I'd been wondering how we could narrow the scope and find technical areas where UW can collaborate with other Ubuntu teams needing help.

In essence that is the usecase: Suppose a woman lists "C/C++ and networking" or "python and AI" as her skillsets, how could we scrape information from LP and use it to channelize women to specific bugs that need squashing --the difficulty level, its upstream/downstream, etc... Could we use an API for data-mining LP for possible areas of interest and list these on our wiki-pages, or post mails to the mailing list or push them into an RSS/Atom news feed on planet.ubuntu-women.org, enabling interested folks to subscribe to the news feed.

After that I pinged Asheesh of openhatch which does something similar -- tags all the floss bug trackers for open bugs, small bite-sized bugs and the big ones too. The idea sounded interestin to him and he called for a meetup -- The meetup is on Monday, Oct11 at 9am IST on #openhatch (logged) on irc.freenode.net and its just meant to bounce off ideas iirc.

PyDojo-20101008

As per the schedule, we had the first dojo meet at CIS yesterday. Met Satish Kumar while searching for the CIS office and a helpful biker who cursed google-maps actually guided us there as we were both relying on the wrong geo-location plots on Google-maps (openstreetmap someone?)...as if the city's whimsical penchant for one-way roads was not irritating enough. There is an interesting anecdote --the biker who guided us there took us to the exact building and i asked him how he knew the place when 'CIS' didnt strike a memory chord. He promptly replied that there was a foreigner (he used the term 'white') who worked at CIS whom he has seen around town. Ah! There is something about finding your way around Indian roads, something to be said about the human touch that google-maps or other tech gadgets cannot compete with.

The CIS staff were very helpful and Royson immediately arranged refreshments and we both started off discussing what the dojo was all about -- many dojo participants around the world were nice enough to have a discussion on how they did things, what worked and didnt -- so it being the first day we had time to discuss how to structure it or not to have a structure at all, etc... In the middle of this discussion NigelB and Akshay Gandhi walked in and the discussion veered to the RHCE course he had joined. Later Nigel showed us the git graph he was working on. We had a longish discussion on git, bug trackers, communities and it was 8.45pm when we left, but not before planning to meet next week to work on nltk at 7pm same place. Join us!

I'm was multi-tasking --listening to a IE9 product pitch for html5/css3, while typing this entry, so any errors and missing information can be attributed to the much tortured greycells. </excuse>

2010 September 30 [Thursday]

Weekly Python-Dojo at Bangalore

In an IRC discussion this week, I suggested we kick-start a weekly python-dojo meet-up in Bangalore. Sunil Abraham of CIS was kind enough to donate their office space and even offered to sponsor the java (pun unintended). Thanks Sunil/CIS.

So here's the plan for weekly python-dojo sessions in Bangalore,

WHAT: Weekly python-dojo sessions in Bangalore which is inspired by dojorio (english translation) meetups in Brazil where they apply the "small acts manifesto". The idea is to create a friendly atmosphere which encourages "beginners" (...and experts and everyone in between) to share and learn with the community. Please bring your laptops/netbooks etc.. as the dojo will be hands-on where we will work on small problems that exist in FLOSS software which automatically helps us learn a lot more about our system. Folks that dont have laptops are also welcome -- atm, we cant provide machines to work on but you can watch others, ask questions, learn, and later try it out at home.

WHO can participate: ANYONE. Absolutely anyone can walk in and participate at the venue. There is no registration fee or cost (except your time and travel costs perhaps?). There is no agenda either -- please note that the environment would be similar to that of an unconference. There is no formal teaching involved. We are all learners here and you are free to ask any python-related question.

WHERE: The Centre for Internet and Society (google map link)
No. 194, 2nd 'C' Cross, Domlur 2nd Stage, Bangalore 560 071

WHEN: 7pm-8pm every Friday. We start from next week, 08Oct2010.

So if you are interested in python, dont hesitate to join us for the weekly dojo sessions and do spread the word -- dent/tweet, blog and mail your friends about the weekly dojo meetups.

PS: If anyone (women in particular) feels the evening timings are rather late for traveling please feel free to suggest a more convenient day (sat/sun?) and time <-- its not set in stone and suggestions are welcome.

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